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>> welcome to the program. tonight we begin with new orleans the city, and three people who recently moved back here because of their love of it. reflecting are james carville, mary matalin and julia reed. >> so what do you love about being here? >> let us count the ways. >> this is the way that i can explain new orleans. everybody else talks about a quality of life. you live in washington,-- the mondayments, the buildings, the kennedy center, the universities, the great medical centres, very highly rated quality of life. here no one ever speaks of the quality of life, it's a way of life. we have our music, our food, our social structure, our architecture, our body of literature. we even have our own funerals. so weeasure qlity of life by way of life, if our way of iv is intact and our culture is intact, then that's fine. and we don't really, in a big part of our way of life is to be comfortable with our otherness. we really don't aspire. we love to go to new york. we love to go to las vegas, and we love to go to washington, or anywhere. >> rose: even paris. >> paris who wou
next week. >>> also, judy valente reports on the city long known for its religious conservatism that spent all last year fostering interfaith understanding. >>> and sufi whirling dervishes at washington's smithsonian institution. >>> welcome. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. a dramatic developme this week the catholic church's sex abuse crisis. prominent retired cardinal roger mahony was stripped of his public and administrative church duties in los angeles amid widespread criticism of how he covered up allegations of child sex abuse by priests. l.a.'s current archbishop jose gomez took the unprecedented step as the archdiocese began releasing internal documents which revealed the extent to which mahony worked to protect the church from the abuse scandal. gomez said the behavr described in the files was "sad and evil." mahony has issued several apologies for his actions. advocates for sex abuse victims called this a largely symbolic move. but church experts say it's the first time in the crisis that any action has been taken against such a high-rank
-- implement a public finance system based on new york city. it works well in new york city. it will work well in new york state. >> do you think he's serious? >> i do think he's serious. >> how will he prove he's serious? >> well, he'll prove his seriousnessy getting this bill paed in the ming legislature. i think we can have confidence that the governor will be able to pass something that is called campaign finance reform in this state. the real test and measure is going to be whether it includes this citizen funding. >> how would public funding work? >> well, it can work a lot of different ways. for obvious reasons it's most useful to point to new york city when you're in new york state. here we have a system in the city if you're running for citywide office or for city council, any contribution up to, you qualify to get into the systemyou ect to be in the system, it's voluntary. then any contribution up to $175 is matched six to one -- >> by the public? >> by the public. out of a pool from the general fund from the budget. and that has had a dramatic transformative effect in the way that f
-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was de ssible b the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: millions of people in the northeast and new england battened down for a weekend blizzard today. forecasters warned it could be one for the record books. by this afternoon, the gathering storm was beginning to whiten the landscape for hundreds of miles, with long
,500 troops. they've been in mali for four weeks fighting against islamic extremists. in mexico city, rescue workers kept up their search for survivors of an explosion at the offices of mexico's state-run oil company. the blast happened late yesterday, killing at least 33 people and wounding 121 others. rescue workers dug through the rubble of the basement and first three floors of the building ere about 2 people worked. e causof t blast is still unknown and authorities are investigating. the retired cardinal of los angeles, roger mahony, was relieved of all his public duties today by his successor. it came as the diocese released thousands of previously secret documents showing he shielded priests who sexually abused children decades ago. the public censure was unparalleled in the american catholic church. mahony will still be able to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping dn. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt
near the northern city of aleppo. they say they've captured fighter jets and a large number of weapons. they say some of the planes appear to be in working order. rebels seized syria's largest dam on monday. they've been launching attacks on aleppo's international airport. government troops have responded with air strikes on aleppo and the capital damascus. opposition activists say more than 50 people died in the latest fighting. >>> a man has attacked people in the u.s. pacific territory of guam with a knife. local police say he killed two people and he wounded at least 12 other people, 11 of them japanese. the man reportedly slammed his car into a shop in the busy tourist district of tumon. then he started attacking people. hospital officials say the two dead were japanese women. they say the wounded include an 8-month-old baby and a 3-year-old child. fire officials say three people died. police say they've detained a 21-year-old american resident of guam. >>> japanese exporters and stock investors have seen the decline of the yen and have cheered it on, but today they're seeing a di
fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know, literally shook me out of bed. i kind of gathered myself and looked out the window and i saw this giant streak across the sky that was th
here in new york city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the captive? >> us, all of us. what's happened is that these enormous telecommunications companies, comcast and time warner on the wired side, verizon and at&t on the wireless side, have divided up markets, put themselves in the position where they're subject to no competition and no oversight from any regulatory authority. and they're charging us a lot for internet access and giving us second class access. this is a lot like the elecifation story from the beginng othe 20th ctury. initially electricity was viewed as a luxury. so when f.d.r. came in, 90% of farms didn't have electricity in america at the same time that kids in new york city were playing with electric toys. and f.d.r. understood how important it was for people all over america to have the dignity and self-respect and sort of cultural and social and economic connection of an electrical outlet in thr home. so he made sure to take on the special interests that were controlling electric
at gun shows. that dpebt is now spreading well beyond washington as cities and states take steps to distance themselves from gun manufacturers. in new york last week, the city school teachers pension fund sold off $13.5 million it held in stock with five gun makers. that followed action in california where the state teachers retirement system also stripped itself of $11.7 million of investments from three gun manufacturers. and the golden state's $254 billion public employees retirement system is also deciding whether to withdraw the $5 million worth of shares it holds in two companies. in chicago, mayor rahm emmanuel focused on banks, asking t.d. bank and bank of america to stop financing gun manufacturers. chicago's gun violence has placed it in the center of the national debate. michelle obama attended the funeral of hadiya pendleton who was shot to death near her school days after marching in the presidential inaugural parade and pendleton's parents joined mrs. obama as her guest at the state of the union speech last week. president obama returned to his hometown last week to
something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammunition. >> the only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the american people decide it's important. if you decide it's important. if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, americans of every background stand up and say, "this time it's got to be different." >> ifill: the obama administration has been working to build on public outrage sparked by the mass shooting in newtown connecticut that left 20 children and six adults dead. ♪ for purple mountain majesty ♪ above... >> ifill: echos of that crime were still in the air last night at the super bowl where the sandy hook elementary school chorus sang "america the beautiful" before kick-off. and a super bowl ad paid for by mayors against illegal guns, a gun-control group, financed by new york mayor michael bloomberg, appeale
flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also be historic. weather forecasters predict it will leave up to three feet of snow in a wide swath stretching from new york to boston. preparations are well underway. airlines cancelled nearly 4,500 flights, leaving many travelers stranded. >> here at laguardia, as you can see, our port authority men and women are hard at work preparing for the storm. our fleet of snow removal vehicles and sand and agent spreaders are prepped and ready for action. >> reporter: amtrak has also canceled many trips in the northeast. the storm is expected to deliver a harsh blow to areas of the east coast still recovering from superstorm sandy. >> hurricane sandy cost the economy a $100 billion and the recovery efforts are still
than alderman of a city in the state of illinois. that's shameful that it took this long. but i'm certainly not going to be the last. >> tulsi gabbard is the opposite of the old guard in d.c. politics. the first hindu in congress and first american samoan, is also one of the first female combat veterans sworn in to serve in the house of representatives. >> i had enlisted in the hawaii army national guard in 2003 the year after i was elected and really it was because i wanted to do more to serve my state and to serve our country. the job that i was trained to do in medical logistics and operations was already filled by someone else so i was not on that mandatory deployment roster, but knew very quickly that there was no way that i could stay home in the comfort of my house and my job and beautiful hawaii and watch my 3,000 brothers and sisters in uniform deploy overseas. so i withdrew form my reelection campaign and got trained in a different job and volunteered to go serve on that 18-month deployment. >> tulsi gabbard, the youngest woman to be elected to a state legislature left
, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how his arrest has focused attention on the unusually high rate of violence against women in south africa. >> domestic violence is shot through the entire society from the highest of the highed in socioeconomic terms to the lowest of the low. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100
is that the price gains were widespread throughout the nation-- 19 out of 20 cities posted increases. the lone exception was new york city, where prices dipped a half a percent. there was more data today reaffirming the housing market recovery. new home sales surged almost 16% in january, lotore an expected and the biggest jump in nearly two decades. so what's behind the turnaround in the housing market? >> the biggest factor is just the fact that prices have fallen to such a level that there are enough willing buyers that see value in this market to come in and basically provide a floor. >> reporter: in fact, investors continue to purchase about nearly one out of every five homes. many real estate experts predict home prices will continue to rise this year, fueled by a dwindling number of properties on the market. in january, the supply of homes for sale fell to its lowest level in nearly eight years. for most people, the biggest impediment to buying a home is not credit score or income. >> it's down payment. most people don't have enough spare cash laying around that they are able to qualify
in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i spoke to him on tuesday if he 90-- 29nd street y here in new york and here is part of that conversation. >> i should take note of the fact that this book is dedicated to his mother, pauline gore o ddt age 92 in 2004, his father died when he was 90. this is good genes, i'm telling you here. and in the dedication he said she gave me a future and a an abiding curiosity about what it holds and a sense of our commune human ablegation to help shape it. so this book is about the question of what are the drivers that are chan
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: michelle rhee is here. she is one of those widely known and perhaps most controversial figures in education. she served as chancellor of the d.c. public school system from 2007 to 2010. her sweeping reforms and hard-nosed style have changed the national debate ov school refo. sh has written a new book about her vision for american education. it's called "radical: fighting to put students first." i am pleased to have michelle rhee back at this table. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: why did you call it "radical"? >> you know, when i started the job in d.c. i was -- i took over the lowest performing and dysfunctional school district in the entire nation. so i started making very rapid changes. i started closing down low-performing schools, removing ineffective educators, icut a central office beaucracy in half. to me those seemed like really obvious moves to make. >> rose: right. >> what was interesting, though, is people started saying "she's a lightning rod, she's radical, she's d
obesity have intensified in recent years. last september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb obesity, but certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take. and we believe that it will help save lives. >> suarez: and today, continuing her long-running "let's move" campaign, first lady michelle obama-- along with big bird of "sesame street"-- issued new public service announcements encouraging kids to get active and eat healthy. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging! >> suarez: if a "healthy" trend is developing, it still has a long way to go. as of 2012, the c.d.c. estimated more than one-third of american adults and one out of three of children were obese. we examine today's numbers and the larger challenges obesity still present
. >>> visitors to the city office near tokyo are enjoying a display of elegance in miniature form. represent members of the nobility and the customes they wore. citizen groups are showing off an extensive collection. the dolls are the centerpiece of a festival every march. families set them out as a way to pray for good health for their daughters. craftsman have been making the dolls for nearly 400 years. residents collected more than 1,800 dolls from all over the country. they're displaying them to draw attention and visitors. the dolls at the top are seven meters off the floor. >> translator: they reach right up to the ceiling. they're amazing. >> translator: it's wonderful to see something big like this. >> the dolls will be on display until march 9th. >>> people who travel a long way to see natural beauty. mountains, water falls, sunsets. but what about fog? residents of one misty town claim their unusual climate is worth the trip. >> reporter: a chilly winter morning. dawn breaks. a dense fog forms in the mountains sweeps down the river valley. and out to sea. locals call this a storm.
, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why the super bowl blackout means it's time for the cities that host professional sports teams to focus on the basics. >> tom: stocks were back in the green after suffering their biggest sell-off in months yesterday. one encouraging sign came from the service sector. the non-manufacturing index slipped in january from december, but not as much as feared, according to the institute of supply management. the employment index was at its highest level in almost seven years. the dow gained 100, the nasdaq increased 40, the s&p was up almost 16. >> susie: the u.s. government made it official today. it filed a suit against standard and poors' credit agency for giving optimistic ratings on troubled securities that later failed and contributed to the financial crisis. the justice department could seek as much as $5 billion from s&p. it claims that's the amount of money federally insured financial institutions lost because of s&p's alleged wrongdoing. the government claims s&p ratings services knowingly executed a "scheme to defraud investors." >> duri
of the capital, a smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build in better safeguards. at the same time, the board said investigators are still weeks away from determining what caused a battery fire on a japan airlines dreamliner in boston. in the meantime, all 50 of the planes in service, remain grounded. budget battle cries echoed up and down pennsylvania avenue in
,000 jurisdictions that are covered, that's all states, municipalities, counties, city governments, in the last ten years there have only been 37 objections. in fact, today chief justice asked the solicitor general in 2005 the year before renewal how many submissions were made of voting changes? 3,700. how many objections were made? just one. the point of that is there is no longer systematic widespread discrimination and the record that congress established did not show that. >> woodruff: sherrilyn? >> that's too narrow a vision of what section 5 does. objections are when the community or jurisdiction proposes a plan, the justice department reviews it and determines that that plan is going to discriminate against minority voters. but there are other things that happen as well. sometimes the jurisdiction submits a plan, the justice department says "we think this plan is problematic, give us more information." and the jurisdiction at that point will decide to withdraw the plan. there are over 800 instances in the period that congress studied in which a jurisdiction did precisely that. >> woodruff: s
. besides mardi gras, it's also still riding high from hosting the super bowl. the city's tourism officials say one million people are in town for the festivities. now, that's more than five times as many people who showed up for the super bowl. new orleans' economy took a big hit when hurricane katrina struck in 2005, but these big turnouts are helping its economic comeback. >> tourism is our most important industry. it's a $5 billion industry for new orleans. it employs 75,000 of our local citizens, so it is absolutely critical that we continue to do events like mardi gras, super bowls, final fours, big conventions, business meetings. that is the lifeblood of the city. >> susie: she also says this year's mardi gras is expected to bring in almost $150 million and that the planning never stops. tomorrow, new orleans will start working on mardi gras 2014. well, that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, february 12. have a great evening, everyone. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.w
opportunity all across my district, including for the inner cities where you see a lot of entrepreneurship but we don't have a lot of access to credit. but it's also an opportunity around manufacturing which happens to be quite important in my district as well. and there are wonderful jobs but we don't have the skill sets so i'm very interested in looking at developmental skill of young people in high school and in community colleges, for example, to have skills that will allow them to do manufacturing in the 21st century. >> and despite being in the minority party, she feels she can get all this and more done. >> i am an optimist and i want to see forward progress for this country. so i hope we movforwrd wh the resolution that allows us to really address these long term issues for the american people. >> i was raised in concord, new hampshire. the youngest of five children. and my family was very politically active. my mother was in the new hampshire legislature for 25 years. and she actually ran for this seat in congress in 1980. and my father served on our executive council. he wasayor
have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset. those are close. the syrians fire at the jordanians every night but the jordanians don't fire back. and bashar's forces shoot and shell the groups of refugees hiding somewhere down there in the darkness. unexpectedly, a jordanian ambulance arrives
should follow the example of a new york city nurse named menchu sanchez. when hurricane sandy plunged her hospital into darkness she wasn't thinking about how her own home was faring. her mind was on the 20 precious newborns in her care and the rescue plan she devised that kept them all safe. we should follow the example of a north miami woman named desaline victor. when she arrived at her polling place she was told the wait to vote might be six hours. and as time ticked by, her concern was not with her tired body or aching feet or whether folks like her would get to have their say. hour after hour a throng of people stayed in line to support her because desiline is 102 years old. they erupted in cheers when she finally put on a sticker that read, "i voted." ( applause ) there's desiline. we should follow the example of a police officer named brian murphy. when a gunman opened fire on a siek temple in wisconsin, brian was the first to arrive. he did not consider his own safety. he fought back until help arrived and ordered his fellow officers to protect the safety of the fellow americans
for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the story of dk cheney is the story of power. he served two terms as vice president, president george w. bush from twub two 2008. he was also secretary of defense he was also chief of staff to president gerald ford. the "washington post" has called him the most influential and powerful man ever to hold the office. he was in washington an insider. his story is a story not only of power but because of what happened after 9/11 it's a story of power and values. we begin a conversation that took place in washington. mr. vice predent, thank you very mu for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot a as of last march i got a
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> great tony kushner is here, 20 years ago he won the pulitzer prize for drama play angels in america since then he has been a consistent force in american theatre. ben brantley of the "new york times" once wrote mr. kushner makes words sing, summer sult as no other living american dram test does. this past year they reminded he was a screenwriter, he wrote the screenplay for lincoln which has been nominated for 12 academy awards including best adapted screenplay. here is the trailer for the film. >> we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain. that this nation under god shall have eye new birth of freedom that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> we can't tell our people we can vote yes in abolishing slavery if at the same time we can tell them we are negotiating a peace >> you cannot have both. >> how many hundreds of thousands have died during your administration. >> hundreds must never declare equal, those who god cr
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> steven brill is here, he wrote the cover story of this week's "time" magazine. it is called bitter pill, why medical bills are killing us. it is the longest piece by a single author ever published by time. it took brill seven months to research and write. he analyzes bills from hospitals, doctors an drug companies to paint an extraordinary picture of medical overspendingment i'm pleased to have stef steven brill back at this table, welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: what got you here this longest piece. >> as you know i like t pick topics where i just feel that i'm curious about them. and for a long time i have just been curious about why health-care costs so much. you know, we've had years of debate about who should pay for health care. how should we do insurance, and who should pay the bills. but i've never seen anyone stop to say hey, wait a minute, how come if will cost you 20 or 25,000 dollars if god-- as you're walking ot of this building, you slip-and-fall and land on your elbow. whwill it cost a million
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: in less than four days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. onomy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning jo
power, and kansas city declared an emergency. the storm had already battered the texas panhandle. winds there reached hurricane force, and piled drifts more than two feet high in some places. negotiations on iran's nuclear program restarted today for the first time in eight months. the two-day talks opened in kazakhstan. the u.s. and other world powers offered to ease some international sanctions, if iran will limit activities that could lead to nuclear weapons. . >> it addresses international concerns on the exclusively peaceful nature of the iranian nuclear program but it's also responsive to iranian ideas. we hope very much that iran will seize this opportunity and come to the talks with flexibility and a commitment to make concrete progress toward building steps. >> sreenivasan: in response, iran said it will make a counter-offer during the talks. in egypt, at least 19 people were killed in one of the deadliest ballooning accidents ever. a hot air balloon carrying touris caught fire over the ancient city of luxor and crashed in a field. the dead were from europe and asia. in additio
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we ve spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higr education. the simple fact that the more education you'v
, maybe two. peak travel to key cities could be snarled by late march. smaller airports may have to shut down altogether. you can find the list on the department of transportation's website. the administration denies these announcements are part of a campaign to pressure house republicans to change course and head off the cuts. >> the idea that we are doing this to create some kind of horrific scare tactic is nonsense. we are required to cut a billion dollars. and if more than half of our employees are at the f.a.a., the f.a.a.-- there has to be some impact. >> reporter: and the f.a.a. cuts don't include potential delays from cutbacks as t.s.a. furloughs employees. the defense department has already informed 800,000 workers they may be furloughed and face a 20% paycut as it struggles to find a way to cut $46 billion from its budget. adding it all up, the president warns the picture is not pretty. >> the overall impact to the recovery will be to slow down the recovery. and not only may there end up being direct job loss, but, because the economy is softer, it also means that we're not goi
funding provided by these funders:. >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: jay fishman is here, he is is the chairman & ceo of travelers. it is one of the nation's leading providers in property & casualty insurance. travelers has also been a leader in corporate america to help educate the public at america's debt crisis. the company recently partnered with public television on a documentary underscoring the urgent challenge ahead it is called overdraft and here is the trailer. >> some people understandably say this is sort of dry subject, dollars, cents, debt. what's it mean to me. if i read the mathematics right it means everything. >> i really genuinely believe this threatens the fundamental economic security of the united states. >> a lot of the democrats are mad because they say well, this is mostly caused by the republicans. without cut taxes and increased spending. the problem for the democrats is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: lawrence summers is here, he is a professor at harvard, where he was president from 2001 to 2006. he was treasury secretary under president clinton and returned to the white house in 2009 as advisor of the national economic council, in that role he was central to president obama's the response to the financial crisis, he is here to talk about the scwes officer imposed in summer of 2011 and intended as a consequence so unaccepble congssnd theresident would have to agree on revenue increases and spending cuts in order to avoid it. with three days to go they have not been able to do that, the first $85 billion about spending cuts will take effect on march 1st, ben bernanke testified to cock earlier today he promised to extend the federal reserve stimulus measures and make made a direct appeal to avoid the sequester. >> the congress and the administration should consider replacing the sharp front loaded spending cuts required by the sequestration with policies that reduce the federal deficit more gradlly in the near
, part of the city's celebrity series, at the beginning of just their second-ever visit to the u.s. backstage, musicians aged 15 to 36 warmed up and chatted in a variety of languages. >> no, no, no! >> brown: at rehearsal, barenboim was a tough taskmaster... >> you see how much more space you have for a crescendo? please don't play mechanically. >> brown: ...cajoling his young musicians. >> you're just playing comfortably without any idea of thought. ya-ba-ba-ba. what is that? >> brown: i watched the rehearsal, and you were pretty tough on them at various points. you kept saying, "you're playing too comfortably." what does that mean? >> it means that to make music, to express music, you cannot adopt the line of least resistance. you have to adopt the line of most resistance. music is not politically correct. music demands total concentration and the perfect, perfect matrimony between thought, feeling, and gut. >> brown: so how? >> and people who think it's easy should choose another profession. >> brown: uncompromising in his music, barenboim is also uncompromising in his politic
which made a mockery of citi credit policy. >> if you take an organization like citigroup, for example-- people involved in due diligence like richard bowen signaled up the line all the way up to robert rubin that something was wrong, that they were finding that some 60% of mortgages they were buying weren't meeting their standards. mr. bowen sent you an e-mail. >> narrator: in one exchange, the commission asked citibank's robert rubin to respond to bowen's e-mail. >> did you ever act on that? >> mr. chairman, i do recollect this and that either i or somebody else-- and i truly do not remember who-- but either i or somebody else sent it to the appropriate people. >> narrator: rubin told angelides that actions were taken to improve the bank's due diligence operations. but his recollections were vague. >> i certainly don't remember today whether i knew at the time or not. i truly don't. >> if the excuse at the top was, "we didn't know," that's a prty pr exse fm pele who are hauling down $10 million, $20 million, $30 million, or, in robert rubin's case, $115 million. >> narrator: bowen wa
rallies, dances and vigils in dozens of major cities. the events were held to coincide with valentine's day. the united nations has estimated that one of every three women worldwide, is raped or beaten in the course of a lifetime. a long-time leader in american a new implantable device that restores some vision in the blind won approval today in the united states. the food and drug administration agreed to allow use of the argus 2 retinal prosthesis. it uses electrodes in the retina that receives signals from a wireless camera on a pair of glasses. initially the device will help small numbers, but it may ultimately treat vision disorders in millions. a long-time leader in american foods-- heinz is being sold to a group that includes warren buffett. the $23.3 billion deal announced today will make heinz a privately held company. on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nine points to close at 13,973. the nasdaq rose a point to close at 3,198. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: there were more hurdles today for president obama's se
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